Posts Tagged ‘Equipment’

Insurance Policies Needed by Sports Organizations

The minimum needed for maximum benefit

Because many sports organizations are run by volunteers, they are often under-insured. Insufficient insurance coverage may be a by-product of money-saving efforts or simply a matter of not understanding the risks of exposure to the athletes, coaches, staff and volunteers, and board members

Below is a list of the most important insurance policies that may be needed by community-based sports organizations such as teams, leagues, and municipal recreation departments.
  1. Accident: Pays medical bills on behalf of injured participants such as players and staff.
  2.  General Liability: responds to lawsuits arising from bodily injury, property damage, personal/advertising injury.
  3. Directors & Officers Liability (AKA Trustees Errors & Omissions for municipal recreation departments): Responds to certain lawsuitSports orginizationss not covered by General Liability such as discrimination, wrongful suspension or termination, failure to follow your own rules or bylaws, and violation of rights of others under state, federal, or constitutional law.
  4. Property/Equipment: Covers your buildings, equipment, and contents against loss due to fire, vandalism, theft, etc.
  5. Crime: Covers employee or volunteer embezzlement of funds or theft of property; forgery or alteration of checks by outsiders, and theft of money and securities by outsiders.
  6. Workers’ Compensation: May be required by state law if three or more employees and pays benefits to injured workers for “on the job” injuries including medical bills, lost wages, disability lump sums, disfigurement lump sums, and death benefits.
  7. Business Auto: Covers liability and physical damage to owned, non owned, and hired autos.
  8. Consult with your insurance agent about other types of policies such as Liquor Liability, Cyber Liability, Media, etc.

We provide more detailed information on each of these policy types and insider tips on purchasing insurance in our article, 7 Critical Mistakes to Avoid When Buying Sports Insurance. If you have questions or want assistance in deciding which policies your organization needs, call us at (800) 622-7370.

Copyright 2002-20014, Sadler & Company, Inc.

Is a League Liable for Faulty Sports Equipment?

Concerns regarding older equipment

We received a phone call from a youth lacrosse club coach who was Lacrosse equipmentconcerned about the use of 20-year-old helmets that haven’t been reconditioned or re-certified. He wanted to know if he could be liable in the event of a head injury to a player since it his responsibility to verify to the referee prior to the game that all equipment is in safe operating condition. He also wanted to know if his General Liability policy would cover any potential lawsuit.

 The short answer is that league administrators and coaches are responsible for the following aspects of equipment safety:
  • Long-range planning for the repair, refurbishment, and replacement of helmets. These decisions need to be made far in advance as they can take time to budget and complete.
  • Confirming helmets meet current National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) requirements, as well as the requirements of the sports governing body.
  • Helmets should be inspected for defects in post season, pre season, weekly, and prior to any game or practice.
  • Maintaining repairing, and conditioning equipment on a regular basis.
  • Reconditioning to “like new” basis of safety equipment such as helmets should be performed by a reputable reconditioning business as opposed to an on staff trainer. NOCSAE may require re-certification.
  • Replacing helmets on a periodic basis per manufacturers recommendations.
  • Record keeping for documentation purposes on all of the above.
There is no doubt that many of the above outlined principles may have been violated and the coach is justified in his concerns about liability.
 
General Liability generally don’t have an exclusion for lawsuits arising from of injuries due to failure to follow proper equipment safety protocol as outlined above. Therefore, coverage is likely to exist under most policies. However, a minority of policies may have a punitive damages exclusion. Willful disregard of known safety protocol could result in punitive damages. In addition, any litigation, even if covered by General Liability insurance, results in a black eye for the program and pretrial discovery and litigation is an emotional drain on league administrators and coaches.
 
For a more detailed resource on Equipment Safety, see our Risk Management Program For Sports Organizations

Shockstrip External Helmet Pads

Product intended to reduce micro traumatic brain injuries and concussions

Check out Shockstrip.com for complete information on this new product, including the testing results, coach, player, and parent testimonials, and information on concussions.  Test results include adhesive compatibility, friction coefficient analysis, drop testing, and linear impact testing.

Shockstrip is one of many newly-introduced products that claim to reduce impact forces helmet-to-helmet contact that will reduce the chance of micro traumatic brain injury and concussion.

Shockstrip may void the helmet manufacturer’s warranty but they are offering their own warranty in it’s place.

Source: www.shockstrip.com

Recertification and Reconditioning of Sports Equipment

A page on Riddell‘s website discusses their strict standards in the reconditioning and recertification process for sports uniforms and equipment.  This reconditioning process fights bacteria, viruses and mold, which reduces health risks.  Once the process is completed, a final inspection is made to recertify the equipment and uniforms according to the original manufacturing condition.  Watch the video below to learn more about the benefits of reconditioning and recertification.

 

 

Source: Riddell