Archive for the ‘Sportsplex Facility Owners/Operators’ Category

Trampoline + Fitness Class = “Airobics”

Two popular physical activities merge

Trampoline parks are the fastest growing segment of the amusement business and personal fitness trainers are getting in on the action. And their clients are flying to trampoline parks fitness classes, happy to switch their routines up and add novelty moves to their workout regimens.

Why work out on a trampoline?

Trampoline aerobicsIn addition to experiencing a new workout routine and venue, there are other perks for participants. When the body engages in explosive moves or when jogging in place, 80 percent of the shock is absorbed by the trampoline. This makes for much lower impact that’s easier on the joints and ideal for anyone recovering from an injury.

Another benefit to exercising on a trampoline is the full-body workout it offers. An unstable surface such as a trampoline requires many muscles in various parts of your body to engage for balance control, which makes for an extra challenging workout.

“Working out on a trampoline can improve your coordination and agility and, since it puts your musculoskeletal system under slight stress, promotes stronger bones and can ward off osteoporosis,” according to Natalie Rado, a New York City personal trainer.

Adjusting to a new environment

Many of the exercises practiced in a regular gym environment, such as lunges, jumping jacks and kicks, and push-ups are easily done on the trampoline. Sometimes the entire trampoline is used to run laps and some activities are done with a small area. Equipment such as medicine balls, stretch bands, and small weights can also be easily incorporated into workouts, and the intensity scaled up or down to meet individual fitness levels.

There are valid concerns about trampoline safety in general. Only certified fitness trainers should be leading exercise class and be certified in CPR and first aid. Trainers should closely monitor participants at all times. Beefing up the workout shouldn’t require jumping at great heights or dangerous acrobatics, only intensifying the level of the regular workout.

Trainers and trampoline park operators, please visit our Trampoline Park Insurance page that includes tips on risk management. Or call us at 800 (622-7370).

Sources:

Caitlin Carlson, “The New Workout You Have to Try,” WomensHealthMag.com, 16 July, 2013.

Briana Wipf,  “Trampolines add intensity to aerobic workouts,”greatfallstribune.com,  24 June, 2014.

 

 

Trampoline Parks Business Jumps 700 Percent

Entrepreneurs weighing whether to pounce


Trampoline Park BusinessTrampoline parks are the fastest growing segment of the amusement industry with an increase of 700 percent over the last three years. Enterprising investor types are on the sidelines waiting to see if if the public’s interest in pay-to-jump fun will continue to soar or drop with a thud.

The International Association of Trampoline Parks is an organization whose focus is to advance growth and develop industry safety standards.”We’re getting inquiries from new or potential parks every day and more are opening every month,” said Tracey Sarris, executive vice president

Smart investors know they can’t determine long-term profitability only by the long waiting lines to get into these parks, popularity of kids’ trampoline parties, and growing interest in trampoline fitness workouts. Injury and liability risks are also a serious factor.

The issue of safety

There are currently no mandatory national industry safety standards, and so far only Arizona and Michigan have passed regulation legislation. ASTM International, the globally recognized leader in the development of standards for testing and materials, recently published its ASTM F2970-13standard.  However, these standards are only voluntary at this time. Some of the franchised trampoline park companies have created a task force to establish uniform safety standards.

It’s common practice among trampoline parks to have guests review the safety rules and sign a waiver before jumping, have those rules posted, and station staff around every jump zone to ensure everyone follows the rules and assist jumpers when necessary. But not all parks employ best practices, such as emergency medical training for employees, setting limits on number of jumpers, or age/size limits of jumpers.

The cost of doing business

The start-up cost of a new park can run $750,000 to $2 million. That can get paid off fairly quickly with average fee of $10 per half hour of jump time and revenue from trampoline parties and other events, including adult trampoline basketball and trampoline aerobics classes. However, maintaining the park and keeping it safe and well-staffed could cut into profits.

The insurance fees park owners pay can be 6 to 7 percent of  their gross revenues.  Some of the larger franchise operators have arranged group insurance programs for their franchisees.

If you want more information on trampoline parks or are a trampoline park operator looking for insurance, call Sadler Sports and Recreation and Insurance at (800) 622-7370.

 

Source: Joan Verson, NewJersey.com, 27 June, 2014.

 

Safety in the Gym

Risk management from top to bottom

Occasional injuries in a gymnasium or sports facility are to be expected, but they’re usually due to the inherent risk of sports participation. However, no one should ever expect an equipment-related injury.

Safety in the gymIn-depth equipment inspections should be conducted annually, and visual spot checks every month. Documentation of these inspections is an integral part risk management and can be the key to combatting allegations of negligence or noncompliance in the event of an injury claim. (I’ll add internal link here to our blog post about the popped exercise ball after it posts)

Don’t assume staff is knowledgeable enough to conduct these inspections. If necessary, hire a professional inspection service. Such services usually don’t perform repairs, but can refer you to a company that does. If performing your own in-house inspections, there are areas that can be easily overlooked.

Looking up

As every grocery store manager knows, people focus on what’s at eye level. Sports facilities often have wall-mounted and/or ceiling-mounted systems, such as basketball nets, storage systems, and lighting. Make it a priority to look up for frayed cables or broken pulleys and mounts. Staff, players and fans are susceptible to serious injuries from stretched cables, loose attachments, or improperly stored equipment.

“If you see something that might be a problem, you need to investigate.” – Nick Cusick, Bison Inc.

Are problems afoot?

The gym floor houses equipment that can poses risks as well. Volleyball nets and soccer goals should be inspected for proper anchoring. Unsecured equipment can fall on players or cause players to trip. Safety wall padding should be checked regularly to ensure none is loose and still in good shape, not torn or worn thin.

Proper and sufficient signage can’t be stressed enough. Not only does it draw attention to safety issues and rules, but is a significant part of any risk management program. In other words, signs protect the public from safety hazards and the gym owner/operator. from potential lawsuits

If you have questions or concerns about safety issues, contact Sadler Sports and Recreation Insurance at (800) 622-7370. And don’t forget to “like” us on Facebook!

Source: Emily Attwood, “Inspections, Monitoring Key to Optimal Gym Operation,“ Athletic Business. March, 2014.

 

 

Swim Club Tragedy

Freak accident highlights need for Accident and General Liability Insurance

An accident can happen anywhere at any time. Recently, 11-year-old Lauren Cecil of North Carolina was electrocuted when an electric surge from a downed power line passed through the pool in which she and two teammates were practicing.

The swim club president witnessed the wire fall and land in a parking lot. When she heard a “popping” noise and saw a puff of smoke, she sent lifeguards to stand guard around the pool and encourage swimmers to exit.  While Cecil’s teammates were able to safely jump out of the pool, she attempted to leave using a ladder. Unfortunately, the metal ladder served as a conductor that sent a shock through her body.

Lifeguards were unable to retrieve her from the pool immediately because the water continued to transmit electric shocks. They eventually used a body board and kickboard to remove Cecil from the pool and begin CPR. Their attempts to resuscitate her were unsuccessful and she was later pronounced dead at a local hospital.

In the insurance industry, we are in the business of expecting the unexpected. Crazy things happen every day. Tragedies such as the one that befell Lauren Cecil are not unheard of, so it is important to protect your swim club or fitness facility in the event of an accident. General Liability and Accident insurance are the best forms of protection for ensuring that your organization and its administrators, staff, and participants do not suffer a serious financial loss as the result of unforeseen circumstances.

Source: 11-year-old North Carolina Girl Electrocuted While Swimming in Pool

Directors & Officers Liability Insurance for Leagues/Associations

When a General Liability policy isn’t enough

Directors & Officers Liability insurance for sports organizations covers certain types of lawsuits that are not covered by the more common and better known General Liability policy. General Liability covers certain lawsuits alleging bodily injury, property damage, personal injury, and advertising injury.  Directors & Officers Liability typically covers the following broad classes of lawsuits:

  • Discrimination based on race, sex, age, or disability
  • Wrongful suspension or termination of league personnel or players
  • Failure to follow own rules or bylaws when making an administrative decision
  • Violation of rights of others under constitutional, federal, or state law
  • Financial mismanagement

The Directors & Officers Liability policy pays covered legal defense costs. It also pays up to the policy limit in the event of settlement or adverse jury verdict.

Over the past 10 years, the types of claims that are potentially covered by the Directors & Officers Liability policy have increased dramatically as the public has become more litigious. The most common categories of lawsuits include disability discrimination under the Americans With Disability Act (ADA), player eligibility disputes, and league administrators not following their own rules or bylaws when making decisions. We have also seen claims involving breach of contract (usually excluded by most policy forms), race discrimination, violation of expression of religious freedom, failure to make all-star team, improper coaching resulting in loss of college scholarship, violation of Sherman Anti-Trust/Restraint of Trade, internal board disputes (usually excluded by most policy forms), injunctive relief to halt a tournament due to player eligibility issues (often not covered by most policy forms), etc.

The Directors & Officers policy form varies greatly from one carrier to the next. As a result, a detailed review is required to uncover dangerous exclusions that would take away essential coverages. Some important policy provisions include employment practices liability and 3rd-party liability, including discrimination. Unfortunately, most insurance agents are not competent in this area. The insurance experts at SADLER SPORTS & RECREATION INSURANCE can easily guide you through such a review.

Call us today at (800) 622-7370.

 

 

Importance of a General Liability Policy

Why all sports teams, leagues and organizations need one

General Liability for sports organizations protects against covered claims or lawsuits primarily resulting from bodily injury, property damage, personal injury, and advertising injury.

  • Bodily injury claims generally arise from injuries to sports participants or spectators.
  • Property damage claims are normally associated with damage to sports facilities or spectator vehicles.
  • Personal injury lawsuits commonly arise from a slander or libel.
  • Advertising injury claims may arise from incorrect statements or comparisons about a competing sports program that are contained within promotional materials of a sports organization.

General Liability pays covered legal defense costs and any settlement or adverse jury verdict expenses up to the policy limit. One of the most important reasons for carrying General Liability is to get coverage for legal defense which of often the most expensive element of sports litigation. It is not uncommon for legal defense costs to exceed $50,000, even in cases where the sports organization is ultimately found to not be negligent.

 

Source: John Sadler
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