Archive for the ‘Sports Tournaments’ Category

When Youth Sports Teams Move Up One Year

Is it safe in all age categories?

What liability exposure exists for administrators and coaches who allow a younger sports team to play up in an older age category? That question was asked by a visitor to our website:
“I am struggling with a team playing up a year in age U12 Boys moving to U13 Boys in soccer. What are your thoughts? And do you know of any lawsuits. I am on the board and I want to be able to answer any questions.”
We invited a guest expert to respond to that for us. Gil Fried is an attorney and professor at the University of New Haven who provided the following answer:
“I am not familiar with any lawsuits from a younger group moving up one age category.  If they moved up several years the proportional difference in skill and size could open a door to liability.  Since the potential for in jury exists at all soccer levels, I would suggest that the children in the 12-year-old group and their parents be sent a letter indicating the potential concern that since younger kids are playing against older kids there could be a chance for injuries. The letter should be clear and allow parents to pull their child if they are concerned without any retribution.”

Hotel Safety: Teams Traveling Overnight (Infographic)

Protecting athletes and staff from sex abuse/molestation incidents

 All parents have the expectation that youth sports organizations provide a safe and fun environment for the athletes. Any organization that supervises kids has a clear mandate to incorporate policies to prevent injuries of any kind. Child abuse and molestation can take place anywhere, and any program where adults supervise children is fertile ground for predators.

Most child predators are “groomers” as opposed to “grabbers” and it’s their modus operandi to earn the  trust of the child and parents prior to any abuse taking place. They create an emotional bond with the child, which works to prevent the child from reporting incidents. Youth sports programs are prime targets for perpetrators of these crimes.

Extra precautions need taken when youth sports teams travel out of town overnight for tournaments and camps. Below are basic tips to help protect young athletes from adults who intend to do them harm, and minimize the risk of coaches and chaperones being accused of improper or criminal behavior toward the children.

Hotel safety

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Please visit our Risk Management page for more sports tips and safety information.

Protecting your team and league from liability claims

Did you know that liability protection is critical for all teams and leagues? It only takes one injury-related lawsuit to financially ruin your organization. Having the right insurance protection offers you peace of mind.

Getting the right insurance coverage does not have to be complicated if you work with an agency like SADLER. The insurance experts at SADLER understand your needs and the unique risks associated with your sports or recreation organization.

To learn more about liability prevention or get a customized insurance quote, you can apply online right now or call us at 1-800-622-7370. There are no obligations. Most quotes are sent in just a few hours. Since there no application fees and we offer the most competitive rates in the industry, what do you have to lose?

Directors & Officers Liability Insurance for Leagues/Associations

When a General Liability policy isn’t enough

Directors & Officers Liability insurance for sports organizations covers certain types of lawsuits that are not covered by the more common and better known General Liability policy. General Liability covers certain lawsuits alleging bodily injury, property damage, personal injury, and advertising injury.  Directors & Officers Liability typically covers the following broad classes of lawsuits:

  • Discrimination based on race, sex, age, or disability
  • Wrongful suspension or termination of league personnel or players
  • Failure to follow own rules or bylaws when making an administrative decision
  • Violation of rights of others under constitutional, federal, or state law
  • Financial mismanagement

The Directors & Officers Liability policy pays covered legal defense costs. It also pays up to the policy limit in the event of settlement or adverse jury verdict.

Over the past 10 years, the types of claims that are potentially covered by the Directors & Officers Liability policy have increased dramatically as the public has become more litigious. The most common categories of lawsuits include disability discrimination under the Americans With Disability Act (ADA), player eligibility disputes, and league administrators not following their own rules or bylaws when making decisions. We have also seen claims involving breach of contract (usually excluded by most policy forms), race discrimination, violation of expression of religious freedom, failure to make all-star team, improper coaching resulting in loss of college scholarship, violation of Sherman Anti-Trust/Restraint of Trade, internal board disputes (usually excluded by most policy forms), injunctive relief to halt a tournament due to player eligibility issues (often not covered by most policy forms), etc.

The Directors & Officers policy form varies greatly from one carrier to the next. As a result, a detailed review is required to uncover dangerous exclusions that would take away essential coverages. Some important policy provisions include employment practices liability and 3rd-party liability, including discrimination. Unfortunately, most insurance agents are not competent in this area. The insurance experts at SADLER SPORTS & RECREATION INSURANCE can easily guide you through such a review.

Call us today at (800) 622-7370.



Excess Accident Insurance

The first line of defense against lawsuits

Sports Accident insurance pays covered medical expenses of injured participants such as players, coaches, managers, umpires, etc. The coverage is normally excess or secondary, which requires other insurance such as family health insurance to respond first.

There are three basic scenarios that can arise under excess Accident insurance:

  1. If existing family insurance pays for 100 percent of all medical bills, the excess Accident policy will not make payment for any benefits.
  2. If existing family insurance pays for only 80 percent of all medical bills (due to deductibles or coinsurance provisions), the excess Accident policy will pay for the remaining 20 percent less any deductible or other policy limitations.
  3. If no family insurance exists, the excess Accident policy becomes primary and pays covered benefits less any deductible or other policy limitations.

The existence of excess Accident insurance on all participants is the first line of defense against lawsuits arising from injuries to sports participants. Much of the incentive for an injured participant or parent to file a lawsuit is removed if either existing family health insurance or the excess Accident policy will guarantee that no out-of-pocket medical bills will be incurred.

Uncovered medical bills will ultimately result in nasty dunning letters and collection phone calls being made to the responsible party. This usually leads to consultation with an attorney. Of course, the attorney will recommend filing a lawsuit against a deep pocket – the sports organization and its directors, officers, and volunteers.

This is why the few General Liability carriers willing to insure sports organizations require the existence of Accident insurance as a precondition of coverage.